The Imposter Syndrome

If you distinctly lack confidence at work more than other areas of life and do not believe you warrant the success you have achieved, you might have imposter syndrome.

Imposter syndrome

f you distinctly lack confidence at work more than other areas of life and do not believe you warrant the success you have achieved, you might have imposter syndrome.

Imposter syndrome

Imposter syndrome is when you cannot seem to internalise your accomplishments. The persistent feeling of inadequacy may haunt you, even though there is definitive proof that your achievements are the result of hard work and talent. You may experience feelings of intellectual fraudulence and severe self-doubt.

You will feel like you are aren’t a competent, successful individual, you are instead imposing as such. ‘Imposter’ feelings can come in many forms, but they tend to fit in the following three categories:

Feeling like a fake

You may feel like you have deceived others into thinking that you are more competent that you are. You don’t think you deserve your professional position or success. This is typically coupled with the fear of being ‘found out’.

Statements that you may identify with:

  • “I am afraid of the time when my colleagues discover my lack of professional knowledge.”
  • “I often come across as a more competent person than I actually am.”

Your success is attributed to luck

You may have a tendency to feel all of your success is down to luck or another external variable, rather than your skills and perseverance.

Statements that you may identify with:

  • “This won’t happen again.”
  • “I just got lucky.”
  • “This was a total fluke.”
The Imposter Syndrome 1

Downplaying success

Oftentimes when you achieve things that others congratulate you for, you will discount your own success. You may feel that the achievement itself could have been accomplished by anyone.

Statements that you may identify with:

  • “It’s not that big of a deal.”
  • “It wasn’t that important.”
  • “The reason I did so well was because it was an easy task.”

The imposter syndrome is not an ‘all or nothing’ type of mentality. You may only identify some of the feelings in certain situations, or you may know friends or colleagues that exhibit some of these traits.

If you have imposter feelings, you can take positive steps towards changing them. A life coach can offer help and the motivation to get your professional life back on track.

Imposter syndrome is when you cannot seem to internalise your accomplishments. The persistent feeling of inadequacy may haunt you, even though there is definitive proof that your achievements are the result of hard work and talent. You may experience feelings of intellectual fraudulence and severe self-doubt.

You will feel like you are aren’t a competent, successful individual, you are instead imposing as such. ‘Imposter’ feelings can come in many forms, but they tend to fit in the following three categories:

Feeling like a fake

You may feel like you have deceived others into thinking that you are more competent that you are. You don’t think you deserve your professional position or success. This is typically coupled with the fear of being ‘found out’.

Statements that you may identify with:

  • “I am afraid of the time when my colleagues discover my lack of professional knowledge.”
  • “I often come across as a more competent person than I actually am.”

Your success is attributed to luck

You may have a tendency to feel all of your success is down to luck or another external variable, rather than your skills and perseverance.

Statements that you may identify with:

  • “This won’t happen again.”
  • “I just got lucky.”
  • “This was a total fluke.”

Downplaying success

Oftentimes when you achieve things that others congratulate you for, you will discount your own success. You may feel that the achievement itself could have been accomplished by anyone.

Statements that you may identify with:

  • “It’s not that big of a deal.”
  • “It wasn’t that important.”
  • “The reason I did so well was because it was an easy task.”

The imposter syndrome is not an ‘all or nothing’ type of mentality. You may only identify some of the feelings in certain situations, or you may know friends or colleagues that exhibit some of these traits.

If you have imposter feelings, you can take positive steps towards changing them. A life coach can offer help and the motivation to get your professional life back on track.